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Yoghurt

Yoghurt is nature’s food. A mildly sour-tasting yoghurt, kiselo mlyako is undoubtedly the best and the healthiest of all dairy products that are available to consumers today. This wonderful probiotic food has impeccable ancestry - it is believed to have been known for at least 4000 years.

Reference: Meyer AL, Micksche M, Herbacek I, Elmadfa I. Daily intake of probiotic yoghurt has a stimulating effect on cellular immunity in young healthy women. Ann Nutr Metab. 2006; 50(3):282-9. Epub 2006 Feb 23. 2006. PMID:16508257.

Yoghurt made in Bulgaria, comes under the general category of yoghurts which contain live bacteria. It is made with two specific starter bacteria, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspecies bulgaricus (often simply called Lactobacillus bulgaricus) and Streptococcus salivarius subspecies thermophilus (often shortened to Streptococcus thermophilus).

It is the particular combination of bacteria that characterizes the thickness, acidity, taste and aroma of the yoghurt. Kiselo mlyako's uniqueness lies in the peculiarities in the climate of the region and the very specific way in which it is prepared – using a combination of the two strains: Lactobacillus Bulgaricus and Streptococcus Thermophilus. The Streptococcus Thermophilus bacterium goes into action first and prepares the perfect environment for Lactobacillus Bulgaricus, which in turn starts multiplying and slowly turns the milk into yoghurt.

Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspecies bulgaricus (until 1984 known as Lactobacillus bulgaricus) is one of several bacteria used for the production of yoghurt. It is also found in other naturally fermented products. First identified in 1905 by Dr. Stamen Grigorov, the bacterium feeds on milk to produce lactic acid which is used to preserve milk. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a starter for making yoghurt and unlike other starters for making yoghurt as it disappears from the intestine within two weeks after yoghurt consumption is stopped.

Because of the ability of yoghurt-fermenting bacteria to break down milk sugar (or lactose), people intolerant to dairy products due to lactase enzyme deficiency can usually eat yoghurt. By manufacturing lactic acid (from lactose), bulgaricus provides a good environment for the resident bacteria such as acidophilus and the bifid bacteria. The bacteria are helpful to people suffering from lactose intolerance which occurs in individuals who lack the enzyme to break down lactose to simple sugars. It is a Gram-positive rod that may appear long and filamentous. It is also non-motile, and it does not form spores. This bacterium is regarded as acidotic or acidophilic, since it requires a low pH (around 5.4-4.6) to grow effectively. The bacterium has complex nutritional requirements, including the inability to ferment any sugar except lactose, from which it produces lactic acid, which gives yoghurt its tart flavor and acts as a preservative. The bacterium also partially coagulates the milk proteins. While fermenting milk, it produces acetaldehyde, which is one of the main yoghurt aroma components.
Reference: National Institute of Health. National Centre for complementary and Alternative Medicine (http:nccam.nih.gov/health/probiotics)

Yoghurt made with Lactobacillicus bulgaricus is organic and an excellent diet food. Not only yoghurt is nutritionally sound but it also makes you feel fuller faster. It is a good source of proteins too.

 Characteristics and Requirements
 Bulgarian Yoghurt
Indicators:CowSheepBuffaloGoatMix
Physicochemical:     
Dry matter,%
not less than:
- Whole milk
- Partly skimmed


11,8
10,3


16,5


16,0


11,0


13,0
Milk protein content,%,
not less than
3,25,24,23,04,0
Fat content,%
not less than:
- Whole milk
- Partly skimmed


3,6
2,0


6,5


7,0


3,0


5,0
Energy [5], kcal/100 g,
not less than:
- Whole milk
- Partly skimmed


62,0
48,0


97,0


98,0


57,0


79,0

About Lactobacilius Bulgaricus

Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspecies bulgaricus (until 1984 known as Lactobacillus bulgaricus) is one of several bacteria used for the production of yoghurt. It is also found in other naturally fermented products.

By manufacturing lactic acid (from lactose), bulgaricus provides a good environment for the resident bacteria such as acidophilus and the bifid bacteria. Because of the ability of yoghurt-fermenting bacteria to break down milk sugar (or lactose), people intolerant to dairy products due to lactase enzyme deficiency can usually eat yoghurt.

Recipes with Yoghurt

CAMPAIGN FINANCED WITH AID FROM
THE EUROPEAN UNION AND
THE REPUBLIC OF BULGARIA